Curtiss Jenny Restoration

Welcome! We hope you enjoy following the restoration process of a 1918 Curtiss JN4D Jenny. Once completed, the aeroplane will be flown and displayed at the Candler Field Museum in Williamson GA (30 miles south of Atlanta). You can contact me below by clicking on "VIEW MY PROFILE"

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Location: Peachtree City, Georgia, United States

Tuesday, June 27, 2006

Stab finishing touches and Elevator construction

Had a few hours in the shop today. It's amazing how lots of small things add up quickly.

Here's the stabilizer strut upper brackets being built. Pretty simple piece made of .10 in sheet steel and 1/4 in holes.
















Next, the tail wire bracket was bent into the 30 degree angle, and the forward tab was bent slightly downward.














Then, the tail hinges were installed. First a 1/4 in hole was drilled through the rear spar. To accept the outer hinge, a bigger 1/2 in hole was drilled into the spar far enough to accept the hinge. ( about 1/4 in deep). As for the rear part of the hinge........
















The original 1/4 in hole was made slightly square at the end (with a small chisel) to accept the rear hinge piece. This prevents the piece from rotation. Then, the front and rear pieces were inserted into the spar and threaded together. You can see this design on an earlier blog. Brass screws also keeps the rear fitting in place.















Now that the stab spruce was varnished, the leading edge was temporarily attached with brass screws. This enabled the final cross brace to be glued into place and the reenforcing blocks made. The cross brace attaches to the wooden hold down blocks (under the clamps). This attachment was temporary, for the leading edge will have to be removed for painting and the blocks would make that a rather unpleasant task.















So, it will be glued and nailed together when the leading edge is painted and permantly mounted.

While that was drying, I started building the first elevator!!! I bent a piece of 3/8 in .058 tubing with a simple pulley wheel from an old washing machine pump. It worked perfectly and my wife was happy because I repaired the washing machine. Sorry for nothing more fancy or scientific, but it works and I'm happy.















I used the Curtiss drawings to set up the elevator outline. Better yet, I was able to trace an original elevator at the Golden Age Air Museum and these patterns were invaluable! Thanks to Paul Dougherty for this.















Hope to build more tomorow. Enjoy.

Brian

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